Khytie K. Brown

Khytie K. Brown

Presidential Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Email Address: 
kkbrown@princeton.edu
Degrees: 
  • Ph.D., Harvard University
  • MTS, Harvard Divinity School
  • B.A., Emory University

Khytie Brown is an ethnographer and scholar of African diaspora religions and African and African American studies. Her research broadly examines the intersections of religion, race, gender and sexual alterity, criminality and social media practices among African diasporic religious practitioners in the Caribbean, Latin America and North America. At Princeton, she will transform her dissertation, “Afro-Queer Journeys: Transnational Revival Zion Religion in Jamaica and Panama,” into a book manuscript. This interdisciplinary work provides a nuanced ethnographic examination of Revival Zion practitioners who travel between Jamaica, Panama and the United States. By exploring how the specters of obeah (witchcraft) and queerness participate in the criminalizing of Revival Zion, her research reveals the interpenetration of Afrophobia and homophobia as colonial legacies that are refracted through sensory hierarchies of difference and chronicles how practitioners navigate these dynamics through spiritual and social technologies. As a Presidential Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Khytie will work at Princeton’s Center on Transnational Policing (CTP) on the Policing African Diaspora Religions project. She is very excited to develop an American Studies Col(lab) on diaspora from an interdisciplinary ethnic studies approach that bridges Black, Latinx and Afro-Latinx studies. In doing so, she aims to contribute to the urgent work of understanding how religious subjects, who occupy marginalized locations, are actively policed and criminalized through racialized, gendered and colonial tropes.

Khytie holds a Ph.D. in African and African American studies from Harvard University. She received a Master of Theological Studies (MTS) degree from Harvard Divinity School in 2013, with an area concentration in Religion and The Social Sciences, as well as a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University in sociology and religion. Her work has been funded by awards and fellowships including the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, the Global Religion Research Initiative at the University of Notre Dame and The David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University.