300 Years in a Convent, 50 in Hollywood

Wed, Oct 6, 2021, 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm
Speaker(s): 
Sponsor(s): 
Program in American Studies
Program in Asian American Studies
Department of Art and Archaeology
Lewis Center for the Arts

In Celebration of Filipino American History Month

Whether framed in terms of exile or diaspora, fleshed out by refugees or contract workers, spurred by a nomadic or cosmopolitan ethos, the migrant departs, leaves traces, and settles. The migrant misses home, wherever and however it is reckoned, but also forges new kinship and solidarities in what Foucault calls the “sudden vicinity of things.” Nine Filipino artists have decided to come together, to release themselves from the confines of their solitary studios and individual careers, from the comforts of their singular trajectories. (...)

(...) As it should be, and true to critical form, the NExSE (Northeast by Southeast) collective of artists marks its presence with a daring aspiration and ultimately a daunting project. ..They recognize “diversity” as a marker of plurality that defines a community or a constituency. This many-ness is “shared” and is productively reciprocal for those who partake of it.

— Patrick Flores

Schedule

Exhibition open 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

Exhibition Walk-through

5-6 p.m.

Artist Panel

With Patrick Flores, professor of art studies, and the artists of NExSE, moderated by Paul Nadal, assistant professor of English and American studies, and Anne Cheng, professor of English.

Program

Following a walk-through of the exhibition, Nadal will facilitate discussion between curator and professor Patrick Flores of the University of the Philippines and the NExSE (Northeast by Southeast) Artist Collective, a collaboration of Filipino-American artists, including Julio Austria, Jeho Bitancor, Mic Diño Boekelmann, Francis Estrada, Ben Iluzada, Ged Merino, Eva Marie Solangon, Maria Stabio.

This exhibition is the result of collaborative engagement between artists in the collective and Patrick Flores’ essay “Movement.” Panelists will discuss the works of the individual artists, the commonalities they share, and the reckoning of U.S. colonial history in this particular contemporary moment.

Join the In-Person Event

The 4:30 p.m. is free and open to the public but advance tickets through University Ticketing are required. One ticket per registrant.

Get directions to the Forum  and CoLab and find other venue information for the arts complex.

COVID-19 Guidance + Updates

Per Princeton University policy, all audiences attending indoor events are required to be fully vaccinated and to wear a mask. Visitors may attend outdoor events and are not required by current University policy to attest to COVID-19 vaccination or wear a face covering.

Accessibility

Visit the Lewis Center for the Arts Venues and Studios section for information on accessibility at various center locations. Attendees in need of access accommodations for this event are invited to contact American studies at least two weeks in advance at ams@princeton.edu.

Join Online

Register on Zoom to join the conversation via webinar with Q&A, or watch the live stream on Media Central Live, starting at 4:30 p.m.